Aim to demonstrate the economic & environmental benefits of demand   response in blocks of buildings


The problem

Utility companies have to generate enough energy to meet large peaks in demand, caused by lots of people using energy at the same time.  Energy networks must also have the capacity to meet this demand. Energy systems are inefficient and expensive as most of the time, demand runs far below capacity.

As electric energy cannot be easily stored the problem is most acute in the electricity sector.   Utilities have traditionally matched electricity demand and supply by controlling the rate of electricity generation.  Therefore things are further complicated when we connect renewables to energy networks which produce energy when the sun shines or the wind blows, rather than when we need it.  

The increasing popularity of electric cars may also increase peak demand as commuters plug them into electricity networks at the same time.

Blocks of buildings offer more flexibility in the timing of energy use, local energy generation and energy storage than single buildings. But a lack of suitable products and technologies make this problematic. 


The solution

Demand response programmes which encourage consumers to change when they use electricity or reduce their total energy use can help keep energy bills low and help integrate renewables into our existing energy networks.

Peak electricity demand can be reduced by:

  • shifting when some electrical equipment is used;
  • using electrical equipment more efficiently;
  • using other types of energy;
  • storing locally generated renewable electricity and using it during times of peak demand.

If we can reduce peak electricity demand we can reduce the investments required in electricity production and electricity networks. These savings can then be passed onto consumers in the form of lower energy bills.

The DR-BOB project will pilot the tools and techniques required for demand response in blocks of buildings with differing patterns of ownership, use and occupation at;

  • Teesside University campus in Middlesbrough in the UK,
  • A business and technology park in Anglet in France,
  • A hospital complex in Brescia in Italy,
  • The campus of the Technical University of Cluj Napoca in Romania. 
prev next
  • Romanian Pilot Site: University of Cluj-Napoca
    Romanian Pilot Site: University of Cluj-Napoca
  • Italian Pilot Site: Fondazione Poliambulanza
    Italian Pilot Site: Fondazione Poliambulanza
  • French Pilot Site: Montuary in Anglet
    French Pilot Site: Montuary in Anglet
  • UK Pilot Site: Teesside University
    UK Pilot Site: Teesside University
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

DR-BOB is working closely with it's sister projects funded under the same call, these include: